Volume 12, Number 18 May 13, 2005

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Theatre renamed for past faculty

Former Place Riel Theatre now called Neatby-Timlin Theatre

The leadership and dedication to learning of two former faculty members in the College of Arts and Science will be recognized with the renaming of Arts 241, formerly Place Riel Theatre.

At its meeting May 6, the Board of Governors approved the administration’s request that the room now be called the Neatby-Timlin Theatre to honour History professor Hilda Neatby (1904-1975) and Mabel Timlin (1891-1976), professor of Economics. The name change is in keeping with the University’s intention to pay tribute to former members of the campus community who contributed to the development and status of a faculty or department, to University life and “to the spirit of the community” within the U of S.

Born in England, Neatby enrolled at the U of S at age 16 and graduated four years later with an honours degree in history. She earned her MA here and a PhD from the University of Minnesota. Over her career, she was the first woman to head a university history department in Canada, the first female president of the Canadian Historical Association and one of the first Companions of the Order of Canada, a distinction she earned in 1967.

In 2000, Neatby’s image appeared on a stamp in Canada Post’s Millennium Collection with the caption “Hilda Marion Neatby: In Love with Learning”.

Timlin’s association with the U of S began in 1921 when she was hired as a secretary. Determined to pursue her education, she earned a BA in 1929 and her PhD in 1940 from the University of Washington at age 49, all while continuing to work full-time. In 1941, she was appointed associate professor in Economics, was quickly promoted to professor and retired in 1959, becoming a professor emeritus.

Her distinguished career also included many firsts, one of the most prestigious being the first female social scientist to be elected to the Royal Society of Canada. She was named to the Order of Canada in 1976 and in 1983, the Department of Political Studies set up the Timlin Lecture Series to mark its association with her.


For more information, contact communications.office@usask.ca


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